Teaching with the brain in mind

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Program Spotlight: The Afterschool Olympics

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Thinking about learning

Watson’s Theory of Behaviourism
05:50

Watson’s Theory of Behaviourism

John B. Watson famously claimed that if he were to be given a dozen healthy infants, he could shape them into anything; doctors, lawyers, artists, beggars, or thieves, regardless of their background or genetic predispositions. First, he completed experiments with 8-month old Albert. He later applied his theory when raising his own children. In essence, he applied the scientific method to human psychology which he called behaviorism. Support us to educate more parents about Watsons dangerous ideas: www.patreon.com/sprouts 💛 Download the video for FREE and without ads and background music 🔽 🤫: www.sproutsschools.com Read the entire script here: https://docs.google.com/document/d/19I0l9wioyIrFr5Aq2dcbeZCu6DY6Lz5x45oWZpWZAPA/edit?pli=1 Script: Jonas Koblin Artist: Pascal Gaggelli Voice: Matt Abbott Recording: Notienatsu Editing: Oran Charoenlap Creative Director: Selina Bador Made with MinuteVideos This video was made with the support of our Patrons: Avigail, Badrah, Cedric Wang, Eva Marie Koblin, Esther Chiang, David Markham, Denis Kraus, Don Bone, Jakob Dannesboe, John Zhang, Julien Dumesnil, Mathis Nu, Tsungren Yang, and all the others!!! Subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-RKpEc4eE9PwJaupN91xYQ Sources: John Broadus Watson (January 9, 1878 – September 25, 1958) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_B._Watson Behaviorism https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Behaviorism Watch https://youtu.be/9hBfnXACsOI The literature of Early Child Rearing https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2014-55587-006.html The Dark Night of Behaviorism http://robothink.blogspot.com/2005/09/long-dark-night-of-behaviorism.html The Sad History of Sleep Training https://www.paperpinecone.com/blog/training-sleep-training-history-behind-question Original Quote: Give me a dozen healthy infants, well-formed, and my own specified world to bring them up in and I’ll guarantee to take anyone at random and train him to become any type of specialist I might select -- doctor, lawyer, artist, merchant-chief and, yes, even beggar-man and thief, regardless of his talents, penchants, tendencies, abilities, vocations, and race of his ancestors. - John B. Watson Further: Famous play by George Bernard Shaw "Pygmalion" later remade in the movie "My Fair Lady" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pygmalion_(play)
8 Stages of Development by Erik Erikson
05:20

8 Stages of Development by Erik Erikson

Erikson's theory of psychosocial development identifies eight stages in which a healthy individual should pass through from birth to death. At each stages we encounter different needs, ask new questions and meet people who influence our behavior and learning. #learn #development Support our work and become a patreon: https://bit.ly/3zlDXw4 Never miss a new video with our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dNU4BQ 1) Basic Trust vs. Mistrust, Infancy (1-2 years) As infants, we ask ourselves if we can trust the world and we wonder if it's safe. We learn that if we can trust someone now, we can also trust others in the future. If we experience fear, we develop doubt and mistrust. The key to our development is our mother. 2) Autonomy vs. Shame & Doubt, Early childhood (2-4 years) In our early childhood, we experience ourselves and discover our body. We ask: is it okay to be me? If we are allowed to discover ourselves, then we develop self-confidence. If we are not, we can develop shame and self-doubt. Both parents now play a major role. 3) Initiative vs. Guilt, Preschool Age (4-5 years) In preschool, we take initiative, try out new things, and learn basic principles like how round things roll. We ask: Is it okay for me to do what I do? If we are encouraged, we can follow our interests. If we are held back or told that what we do is silly, we can develop guilt. We are now learning from the entire family. 4) Industry vs. Inferiority, School Age (5-12 years) Now we discover our own interests and realize that we are different from others. We want to show that we can do things right. We ask if we can make it in this world? If we receive recognition from our teachers or peers we become industrious, which is another word for hard-working. If we get too much negative feedback, we start to feel inferior and lose motivation. Our neighbors and schools now influence us the most. 5) Identity vs. Role Confusion, Adolescence (13–19 years) During adolescence, we learn that we have different social roles. We are friends, students, children, and citizens. Many experience an identity crises. If our parents now allow us to go out and explore, we can find an identity. If they push us to conform to their views, we can face role confusion and feel lost. Key to our learning are our peers and role models. 6) Intimacy vs. Isolation, Early Adulthood (20-40 years) As young adults, we slowly understand who we are and we start to let go of the relationships we had built earlier in order to fit in. We ask ourselves if we can love? If we can make a long-term commitment, we are confident and happy. If we cannot form intimate relationships, we might end up feeling isolated and lonely. Our friends and partners are now central to our development. 7) Generativity vs. Stagnation - Adulthood (40-65) When we reach our forties we become comfortable, use our leisure time creatively and maybe begin contributing to society. Our concern is Generativity. If we think that we are able to lead the next generation into this world, we are happy. If we did not resolve some conflicts earlier, we can become pessimistic and experience stagnation. People at home and at work are now who influence us most. 8) Ego Integrity vs. Despair, Maturity (65-death) As we grow older we tend to slow down and begin to look back over our lives. We ask: how have I done? If we think we did well, we develop feelings of contentment and integrity. If not, we can experience despair and become grumpy and bitter. Time to compare us with mankind. Erik Erikson was a German-American psychologist who together with his wife Joan, became known for his work on psychosocial development. He was influenced by Sigmund and Anna Freud and became famous for coining the phrase "identity crisis." Although Erikson lacked even a bachelor's degree, he served as a professor at Harvard and Yale.
8 Stages of Development by Erik Erikson
05:20

8 Stages of Development by Erik Erikson

Erikson's theory of psychosocial development identifies eight stages in which a healthy individual should pass through from birth to death. At each stages we encounter different needs, ask new questions and meet people who influence our behavior and learning. #learn #development Support our work and become a patreon: https://bit.ly/3zlDXw4 Never miss a new video with our newsletter: http://eepurl.com/dNU4BQ 1) Basic Trust vs. Mistrust, Infancy (1-2 years) As infants, we ask ourselves if we can trust the world and we wonder if it's safe. We learn that if we can trust someone now, we can also trust others in the future. If we experience fear, we develop doubt and mistrust. The key to our development is our mother. 2) Autonomy vs. Shame & Doubt, Early childhood (2-4 years) In our early childhood, we experience ourselves and discover our body. We ask: is it okay to be me? If we are allowed to discover ourselves, then we develop self-confidence. If we are not, we can develop shame and self-doubt. Both parents now play a major role. 3) Initiative vs. Guilt, Preschool Age (4-5 years) In preschool, we take initiative, try out new things, and learn basic principles like how round things roll. We ask: Is it okay for me to do what I do? If we are encouraged, we can follow our interests. If we are held back or told that what we do is silly, we can develop guilt. We are now learning from the entire family. 4) Industry vs. Inferiority, School Age (5-12 years) Now we discover our own interests and realize that we are different from others. We want to show that we can do things right. We ask if we can make it in this world? If we receive recognition from our teachers or peers we become industrious, which is another word for hard-working. If we get too much negative feedback, we start to feel inferior and lose motivation. Our neighbors and schools now influence us the most. 5) Identity vs. Role Confusion, Adolescence (13–19 years) During adolescence, we learn that we have different social roles. We are friends, students, children, and citizens. Many experience an identity crises. If our parents now allow us to go out and explore, we can find an identity. If they push us to conform to their views, we can face role confusion and feel lost. Key to our learning are our peers and role models. 6) Intimacy vs. Isolation, Early Adulthood (20-40 years) As young adults, we slowly understand who we are and we start to let go of the relationships we had built earlier in order to fit in. We ask ourselves if we can love? If we can make a long-term commitment, we are confident and happy. If we cannot form intimate relationships, we might end up feeling isolated and lonely. Our friends and partners are now central to our development. 7) Generativity vs. Stagnation - Adulthood (40-65) When we reach our forties we become comfortable, use our leisure time creatively and maybe begin contributing to society. Our concern is Generativity. If we think that we are able to lead the next generation into this world, we are happy. If we did not resolve some conflicts earlier, we can become pessimistic and experience stagnation. People at home and at work are now who influence us most. 8) Ego Integrity vs. Despair, Maturity (65-death) As we grow older we tend to slow down and begin to look back over our lives. We ask: how have I done? If we think we did well, we develop feelings of contentment and integrity. If not, we can experience despair and become grumpy and bitter. Time to compare us with mankind. Erik Erikson was a German-American psychologist who together with his wife Joan, became known for his work on psychosocial development. He was influenced by Sigmund and Anna Freud and became famous for coining the phrase "identity crisis." Although Erikson lacked even a bachelor's degree, he served as a professor at Harvard and Yale.
EMPATHY - BEST SPEECH OF ALL TIME By Simon Sinek | Inspiritory
14:19

EMPATHY - BEST SPEECH OF ALL TIME By Simon Sinek | Inspiritory

SUBSCRIBE: https://bit.ly/3hNysej ▶Follow us on: Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/inspiritory Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/inspiritory ► SOURCE: Simon Sinek; ► Follow Simon Sinek on: : Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/SimonSinek; Facebook https://www.facebook.com/simonsinek Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/simonsinekinc/ ►Simon Sinek's Books: 1. Start With Why: https://amzn.to/2nQwrXS; 2. Leaders Eat Last: https://amzn.to/2naUWP6; 3. Together Is Better: https://amzn.to/2oJptnf; ================= --------------------- EMPATHY - BEST SPEECH OF ALL TIME By Simon Sinek | Inspiritory ==================== ► Speakers: Simon Sinek; =================== ==================== ==================== FAIR-USE COPYRIGHT DISCLAIMER * Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, commenting, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. 1)This video has no negative impact on the original works (It would actually be positive for them) 2)This video is also for teaching purposes. 3)It is not transformative in nature. 4)I only used bits and pieces of videos to get the point across where necessary. IKWOTE does not own the rights to these video clips. They have, in accordance with fair use, been repurposed with the intent of educating and inspiring others. However, if any content owners would like their images removed, please contact us by email at Thebestmotivator28595@gmail.com;